How to practice: Playing the course on the range

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Published 19/04/2010 08:34:16
 

An alternative method of preparing yourself for the round ahead is to play the course while on the range. This process involves visualising each hole and the shots you face while honing your skills for the specific challenges that you know you are about to take on. This is the second part of our "How to practice" series.

 

Long game

After a short warm-up session (hitting a few wedges and a couple of longer shots), picture yourself standing on the first tee.

Imagine the hole stretched out in front of you and take out the club that you intend to play. Hit the ball and visualise exactly where it would finish on that hole.

Play a second shot from where you expect the first to have finished. If you would be hitting a punch with a 7-iron, then that is the shot you should now play.

Work through all 18 holes playing the sort of shots that you would expect to face out on the golf course.

 

Chipping

If you believe that your approach shot would have missed the green, hit a chip. Think about the sort of short-game escape required and the type of flight needed to get the ball close to the flag. Whether it is a flop shot or a chip-and-run, pick an appropriate target on the range as if you were playing a pin on the course.

 

Shot-shaping

Playing the course while on the range works well because it acts as the perfect mental rehearsal for the round ahead. There should be no surprises in store that you are unable to cope with. If any particular tee shot or approach requires a certain shape - a draw or a fade - try your best to hit it.

Stand behind your ball, picture the hole in question, and try to visualise the required flight.

Now address the ball, taking extra care to ensure that your feet and clubface are aiming in the correct positions.

If you have problems controlling the shape of your shots, or adding the right amount of sidespin, focus on this shot at the end of your practice sessions so you can improve.

 

You can find part one of this guide here: How to practice: Working through the bag




Comments


1.  Checking: Chipping

If you believe that your approach shot would have missed the green, hit a chip. Think about the sort of short-game escape required and the type of flight needed to get the ball close to the flag. Whether it is a flop shot or a chip-and-run, pick an appropriate target on the range as if you were playing a pin on the course.

comment by shedeep - 19/04/2010 13:18

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